I re-wrote the code from the previous entry to do several things. Once of which was to make a gator rather than a fish. It’s more appropriate since I’m planning on housing the transmitter at the University of Florida. To do it, I drew a gator in paint and wrote a python script to convert the image into a series of points. I’ll post it later. One thing to note was that size was a SERIOUS issue. I only have two thousand bytes of code, and every point of that gator was a byte, so it was a memory hog. I helped it dramatically by using repeating segments wherever possible, and some creative math to help out the best I could (i.e., the spines on the back) Here’s what it looks like, and the code below it…

aj4vd_gator

#include <avr/io.h>
#include <util/delay.h>

// front top LED - PA0
// inside top LED - PA1
// inside bot LED - PA2
// front bot LED - PA3

unsigned long int t_unit; // units of time
const int tDit = 100; //units for a dit
const int tDah = 255; //units for a dah
char fsk; // degree of frequency shift to use for CW
char fsk2; // degree of frequency shift to use for HELL

char light = 0; // which lights are on/off


void delay(){
        _delay_loop_2(t_unit);
        }

void blink(){
	return;
	if (light==0){
    	PORTA|=(1<<PA0); //on
    	PORTA|=(1<<PA1); //on
		PORTA&=~(1<<PA2); //off
		PORTA&=~(1<<PA3); //off
		light=1;
	} else {
    	PORTA|=(1<<PA2); //on
    	PORTA|=(1<<PA3); //on
		PORTA&=~(1<<PA0); //off
		PORTA&=~(1<<PA1); //off
		light=0;

	}
}

void tick(unsigned long ticks){
        while (ticks>0){
                delay();
                delay();
                ticks--;
        }
}

void pwm_init() {
    //Output on PA6, OC1A pin (ATTiny44a)
    OCR1A = 0x00; //enter the pulse width. We will use 0x00 for now, which is 0 power.
    TCCR1A = 0x81; //8-bit, non inverted PWM
    TCCR1B = 1; //start PWM
}

void set(int freq, int dly){
        OCR1A = freq;
        tick(dly);
}

void fish(){
	char mult = 3;

	char f2[]={2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 4, 3, 7, 4, 7, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 4, 9, 5, 9, 6, 9, 6, 9, 6, 9, 8, 8, 7, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5};

	for (int i=0;i<sizeof(f2);i++) {
		OCR1A = f2[i]*mult;
		blink();
		tick(20);
		OCR1A = 1*mult;
		blink();
		tick(20);
		}

	char f3[]={1,2,3,4,3,2};

	char offset=0;
	while (offset<9){
		for (char j=0;j<3;j++){
			for (char i=0;i<sizeof(f3);i++){
				char val = (f3[i]+5-offset)*mult;
				if (val<mult || val > 10*mult){val=mult;}
				OCR1A = val;
				blink();
				tick(20);
				OCR1A = 1*mult;
				blink();
				tick(20);
				}
			}
		offset++;
	}


}

void id(){
        char f[]={0,0,1,2,0,1,2,2,2,0,1,1,1,1,2,0,1,1,1,2,0,2,1,1,0,0};
        char i=0;
        while (i<sizeof(f)) {
                blink();
                if (f[i]==0){OCR1A = 0;tick(tDah);}
                if (f[i]==1){OCR1A = fsk;tick(tDit);}
                if (f[i]==2){OCR1A = fsk;tick(tDah);}
                blink();
                OCR1A=0;
				tick(tDit);
                i++;
                }
}

void slope(){
        char i=0;
        while (i<25){
                OCR1A = 255-i;
                i++;
        }
        while (i>0){
                i--;
                OCR1A = 255-i;
        }
}


int main(void)
{
        DDRA = 255;
		blink();
        pwm_init();
        t_unit=1000;fsk=10;id(); // set to fast and ID once
        //fsk=50;//t_unit = 65536; // set to slow for QRSS
		t_unit=60000;

        while(1){;
                fish();
                id();
        }

        return 1;
}




Additional Resources

Finally! After a few years tumbling around in my head, a few months of reading-up on the subject, a few weeks of coding, a few days of bread-boarding, a few hours of building, a few minutes of soldering, and a few seconds of testing I’ve finally done it – I’ve created my first QRSS transmitter! I’ll describe it in more detail once I finalize the design, but for now an awesome working model. It’s ~100% digital, consisting of 2 ICs (an ATTiny44a for the PWM-controlled frequency modulation, and an octal buffer for the preamplifier) followed by a simple pi low-pass filter. I don’t want to waste time typing – let’s show some pics!

qrss desk

My desk is a little messy. I’m hard at work! Actually, I’m thinking of building another desk. I love the glass because I don’t have to worry (as much) about fires. Scary, I know…

qrss transmitter

This is the transmitter. The box is mostly empty space, but it consists of the circuit, an antenna connection, a variable capacitor for center frequency tuning, and a potentiometer for setting the degree of frequency shift modulation.

qrss fish

AMAZING! Yeah, that’s a fishy. Specifically a goldfish (the cracker). It’s made with a single tone, shifting rapidly (0.5 sec) between tones. So cool. Anyway, I’m outta here for now – getting back to the code! I think I’ll try to make a gator…

As it is, here’s the code. It sends my ID quickly, some fish, then my ID in QRSS speed using PWM. You can figure out the pinout… I’ll document it with circuit diagrams soon!

#include <avr/io.h>
#include <util/delay.h>

const int tDit = 270/3;
const int tDah = 270;

char fsk;
unsigned long int t_unit;

void delay(){
	_delay_loop_2(t_unit);
	}

void blink(){
  	PORTA^=(1<<0);
  	PORTA^=(1<<1);
  	PORTA^=(1<<2);
  	PORTA^=(1<<3);
}

void tick(unsigned long ticks){
	while (ticks>0){
		delay();
		delay();
		ticks--;
	}
}


void pwm_init() {
    //Output on PA6, OC1A pin (ATTiny44a)
    OCR1A = 0x00; //enter the pulse width. We will use 0x00 for now, which is 0 power.
    TCCR1A = 0x81; //8-bit, non inverted PWM
    TCCR1B = 1; //start PWM
}

void set(int freq, int dly){
	OCR1A = freq;
	tick(dly);
}

void fish(){
	char f[]={0,0,0,4,5,3,6,2,7,1,5,6,8,1,8,1,8,1,8,1,8,2,7,3,6,2,7,1,8,1,8,4,5,2,3,6,7,0,0,0};
	char i=0;
	while (i<sizeof(f)) {
		i++;
		OCR1A = 255-f[i]*15;
		blink();
		tick(20);
		}
}

void id(){
	char f[]={0,0,1,2,0,1,2,2,2,0,1,1,1,1,2,0,1,1,1,2,0,2,1,1,0,0};
	char i=0;
	while (i<sizeof(f)) {
		blink();
		if (f[i]==0){OCR1A = 255;tick(tDah);}
		if (f[i]==1){OCR1A = 255-fsk;tick(tDit);}
		if (f[i]==2){OCR1A = 255-fsk;tick(tDah);}
		blink();
		OCR1A = 255;tick(tDit);
		i++;
		}
}

void slope(){
	char i=0;
	while (i<25){
		OCR1A = 255-i;
		i++;
	}
	while (i>0){
		i--;
		OCR1A = 255-i;
	}
}

int main(void)
{
	DDRA = 255;
  	PORTA^=(1<<0);
  	PORTA^=(1<<1);
	pwm_init();

	t_unit=2300;fsk=50;id(); // set to fast and ID once

	fsk=50;t_unit = 65536; // set to slow for QRSS

	while(1){
		id();
		for (char i=0;i<3;i++){
			fish();
			}
	}

	return 1;
}




Additional Resources

Success! Amid the plethora of exams, psycho-motor tests, and other crazy shenanigans my dental school is putting me through, I managed to do something truly productive! Check it out. I built a simplest-case QRSS transmitter with an ATTiny44a micro-controller clocked by a 7.04mhz crystal which generates FSK signals and modulates its own frequency by applying potential to a reverse-biased diode at the base of the crystal, the output (CKOUT) of which is amplified by an octal buffer and sent out through an antenna. As it is, no lowpass filtering is implemented, so noisy harmonics are expected. However for ~2$ of parts this is a pretty sweet transmitter!

simple_qrss_transmitter

I was able to detect these signals VERY strongly at a station ~10 miles from my house. I haven’t yet dropped in a 10.140mhz crystal and tried to get this thing to transmit in the non-official QRSS band, but when I do I hope to get reports from all over the world! This is what it looks like:

aj4vd

The cool thing about this transmitter (aside from the fact that it’s so cheap to build) is that it will work with almost any crystal (I think below 20MHz-ish) – just drop it in the slot and go!





Additional Resources

Everyone’s favorite slacker hacked together a script to not only generate, but also thoroughly document equation-based LUTs (look up tables) with Python. There’s been a lot of heated discussion in the QRSS Knights mailing list as to the use of color maps when representing QRSS data. I’ll make a separate post (perhaps later?) documenting why it’s so critical to use particular mathematically-generated color maps rather than empirical “looks good to me” color selections. Anyway, this is what I came up with:

Blin_Glin_Rlin_scale

For my QRSS needs, I desire a colormap which is aesthetically pleasing but can also be quickly reverted to its original (gray-scale) data. I accomplished this by choosing a channel (green in this case) and applying its intensity linearly with respect to the value it represents. Thus, any “final” image can be imported into an editor, split by RGB, and the green channel represents the original data. This allows adjustment of contrast/brightness and even the reassignment of a different colormap, all without losing any data!

ORIGINAL DATA:Blin_Glin_Rlin.jpg (green)
(that’s the “flying W” and the FSK signal below it is WA5DJJ)

LINEAR COLORMAPBlin_Glin_Rlin_graph

RESULTING IMAGEBlin_Glin_Rlin

Note that it looks nice, shows weak signals, doesn’t get blown-out by strong signals, and it fully includes the noise floor (utilizing all available data).

BLUE CHANNEL: weak signals / noise floorBlin_Glin_Rlin.jpg (blue)

RED CHANNEL: strong signals / no noiseBlin_Glin_Rlin.jpg (red)

GREEN CHANNEL: original data!!!Blin_Glin_Rlin.jpg (green)

But what about sinusoidal curves?Bsin_Glin_Rsin_graph

They look okay, but not as great as linearBsin_Glin_Rsin

DOWNLOAD LUTs

The following links are downloadable LUTs which can be applied to 8-bit grayscale images using most editors (i.e., MBF ImageJ) generated by the python script below.
Linear LUT
Sinusoidal LUT

This is the Python script I wrote to generate the downloadable LUTs, graphs, and scale bars / keys / legends which are not posted. It requires python, matplotlib, and PIL.

import math
import pylab
from PIL import Image

####################### GENERATE RGB VALUES #######################

r,g,b=[],[],[]
name="Blin_Glin_Rlin"
for i in range(256):
    if i>128: #LOW HALF
        j=128
        k=i
    else: #HIGH HALF
        k=128
        j=i
    #b.append((math.sin(3.1415926535*j/128.0/2))*256)
    #r.append((1+math.sin(3.1415926535*(k-128*2)/128.0/2))*256)
    r.append(k*2-255)
    g.append(i)
    b.append(j*2-1)

    if r[-1]<0:r[-1]=0
    if g[-1]<0:g[-1]=0
    if b[-1]<0:b[-1]=0

    if r[-1]>255:b[-1]=255
    if g[-1]>255:g[-1]=255
    if b[-1]>255:b[-1]=255


####################### SAVE LUT FILE #######################
im = Image.new("RGB",(256*2,10*4))
pix = im.load()
for x in range(256):
    for y in range(10):
        pix[x,y] = (r[x],g[x],b[x])
        pix[x,y+10] = (r[x],0,0)
        pix[x,y+20] = (0,g[x],0)
        pix[x,y+30] = (0,0,b[x])
        a=(g[x]+g[x]+g[x])/3
        pix[256+x,y] = (a,a,a)
        pix[256+x,y+10] = (r[x],r[x],r[x])
        pix[256+x,y+20] = (g[x],g[x],g[x])
        pix[256+x,y+30] = (b[x],b[x],b[x])
#im=im.resize((256/2,40),Image.ANTIALIAS)
im.save(name+"_scale.png")

####################### PLOT IT #######################
pylab.figure(figsize=(8,4))
pylab.grid(alpha=.3)
pylab.title(name)
pylab.xlabel("Data Value")
pylab.ylabel("Color Intensity")
pylab.plot(g,'g-')
pylab.plot(r,'r-')
pylab.plot(b,'b-')
pylab.axis([-10,266,-10,266])
pylab.subplots_adjust(top=0.90, bottom=0.14, left=0.1, right=0.97)
pylab.savefig(name+"_graph.png",dpi=60)
#pylab.show()

####################### SAVE LUT FILE #######################
f=open(name+".lut",'w')
out="IndextRedtGreentBluen"
for i in range(256):
    out+=("t%dt%dt%dt%dn"%(i,r[i],g[i],b[i]))
f.write(out)
f.close()