Logging I2C Data with Bus Pirate and Python

I’m working on a project which requires I measure temperature via a computer, and I accomplished this with minimal complexity using a BusPirate and LM75A I2C temperature sensor. I already had some LM75A breakout boards I got on eBay (from China) a while back. A current eBay search reveals these boards are a couple dollars with free shipping. The IC itself is available on Mouser for $0.61 each. The LM75A datasheet reveals it can be powered from 2.8V-5.5V and has a resolution of 1/8 ºC (about 1/4 ºF). I attached the device to the Bus Pirate according to the Bus Pirate I/O Pin Descriptions page (SCL->CLOCK and SDA->MOSI) and started interacting with it according to the Bus Pirate I2C page. Since Phillips developed the I2C protocol, a lot of manufacturers avoid legal trouble and call it TWI (two-wire interface).

Here I show how to pull data from this I2C device directly via a serial terminal, then show my way of automating the process with Python. Note that there are multiple python packages out there that claim to make this easy, but in my experience they are either OS-specific or no longer supported or too confusing to figure out rapidly. For these reasons, I ended up just writing a script that uses common Python libraries so nothing special has to be installed.

Reading data directly from a serial terminal

Before automating anything, I figured out what I2C address this chip was using and got some sample temperature readings directly from the serial terminal. I used RealTerm to connect to the Bus Pirate. The sequence of keystrokes I used are:

  • # – to reset the device
  • m – to enter the mode selection screen
    • 4 – to select I2C mode
    • 3 – to select 100KHz
  • W – to turn the power on
  • P – to enable pull-up resistors
  • (1) – to scan I2C devices
    • this showed the device listening on 0x91
  • [0x91 r:2] – to read 2 bytes from I2C address 0x91
    • this showed bytes like 0x1D and 0x20
    • 0x1D20 in decimal is 7456
    • according to datasheet, must divide by 2^8 (256)
    • 7456/256 = 29.125 C = 84.425 F

Automating Temperature Reads with Python

There should be an easy way to capture this data from Python. The Bus Pirate website even has a page showing how to read data from LM75, but it uses a pyBusPirateLite python package which has to be manually installed (it doesn’t seem to be listed in pypi). Furthermore, they only have a screenshot of a partial code example (nothing I can copy or paste) and their link to the original article is broken. I found a cool pypy-indexed python module pyElectronics which should allow easy reading/writing from I2C devices via BusPirate and Raspberry Pi. However, it crashed immediately on my windows system due to attempting to load Linux-only python modules. I improved the code and issued a pull request, but I can’t encourage use of this package at this time if you intend to log data in Windows. Therefore, I’m keeping it simple and using a self-contained script to interact with the Bus Pirate, make temperature reads, and graph the data over time. You can code-in more advanced features as needed. The graphical output of my script shows what happens when I breathe on the sensor (raising the temperature), then what happens when I cool it (by placing a TV dinner on top of it for a minute). Below is the code used to set up the Bus Pirate to log and graph temperature data. It’s not fast, but for temperature readings it doesn’t have to be! It captures about 10 reads a second, and the rate-limiting step is the timeout value which is currently set to 0.1 sec.

NOTE: The Bus Pirate has a convenient binary scripting mode which can speed all this up. I’m not using that mode in this script, simply because I’m trying to closely mirror the functionality of directly typing things into the serial console.

import serial
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

BUSPIRATE_PORT = 'com3' #customize this! Find it in device manager.

def send(ser,cmd,silent=False):
    """
    send the command and listen to the response.
    returns a list of the returned lines. 
    The first item is always the command sent.
    """
    ser.write(str(cmd+'\n').encode('ascii')) # send our command
    lines=[]
    for line in ser.readlines(): # while there's a response
        lines.append(line.decode('utf-8').strip())
    if not silent:
        print("\n".join(lines))
        print('-'*60)
    return lines

def getTemp(ser,address='0x91',silent=True,fahrenheit=False):
    """return the temperature read from an LM75"""
    unit=" F" if fahrenheit else " C"
    lines=send(ser,'[%s r:2]'%address,silent=silent) # read two bytes
    for line in lines:
        if line.startswith("READ:"):
            line=line.split(" ",1)[1].replace("ACK",'')
            while "  " in line:
                line=" "+line.strip().replace("  "," ")
            line=line.split(" 0x")
            val=int("".join(line),16)
            # conversion to C according to the datasheet
            if val < 2**15:
                val = val/2**8
            else:
                val =  (val-2**16)/2**8
            if fahrenheit:
                val=val*9/5+32
            print("%.03f"%val+unit)
            return val
    
    
# the speed of sequential commands is determined by this timeout
ser=serial.Serial(BUSPIRATE_PORT, 115200, timeout=.1)

# have a clean starting point
send(ser,'#',silent=True) # reset bus pirate (slow, maybe not needed)
#send(ser,'v') # show current voltages

# set mode to I2C
send(ser,'m',silent=True) # change mode (goal is to get away from HiZ)
send(ser,'4',silent=True) # mode 4 is I2C
send(ser,'3',silent=True) # 100KHz
send(ser,'W',silent=True) # turn power supply to ON. Lowercase w for OFF.
send(ser,'P',silent=True) # enable pull-up resistors
send(ser,'(1)') # scan I2C devices. Returns "0x90(0x48 W) 0x91(0x48 R)"

data=[]
try:
    print("reading data until CTRL+C is pressed...")
    while True:
        data.append(getTemp(ser,fahrenheit=True))
except:
    print("exception broke continuous reading.")
    print("read %d data points"%len(data))

ser.close() # disconnect so we can access it from another app

plt.figure(figsize=(6,4))
plt.grid()
plt.plot(data,'.-',alpha=.5)
plt.title("LM75 data from Bus Pirate")
plt.ylabel("temperature")
plt.xlabel("number of reads")
plt.show()

print("disconnected!") # let the user know we're done.

Experiment: Measuring Heater Efficacy

This project now now ready for an actual application test. I made a simple heater circuit which could be driven by an analog input, PWM, or digital ON/OFF. Powered from 12V it can pass 80 mA to produce up to 1W of heat. This may dissipate up to 250 mW of heat in the transistor if partially driven, so keep this in mind if an analog signal drive is used (i.e., thermistor / op-amp circuit). Anyhow, I soldered this up with SMT components on a copper-clad PCB with slots drilled on it and decided to give it a go. It’s screwed tightly to the temperature sensor board, but nothing special was done to ensure additional thermal conductivity. This is a pretty crude test.

I ran an experiment to compare open-air heating/cooling vs. igloo conditions, as well as low vs. high heater drive conditions. The graph below shows these results. The “heating” ranges are indicated by shaded areas. The exposed condition is when the device is sitting on the desk without any insulation. A 47k resistor is used to drive the base of the transistor (producing less than maximal heating). I then repeated the same thing after the device was moved inside the igloo. I killed the heater power when it reached the same peak temperature as the first time, noticing that it took less time to reach this temperature. Finally, I used a 1k resistor on the base of the transistor and got near-peak heating power (about 1W). This resulted in faster heating and a higher maximum temperature. If I clean this enclosure up a bit, this will be a nice way to test software-based PID temperature control with slow PWM driving the base of the transistor.

Code to create file logging (csv data with timestamps and temperatures) and produce plots lives in the ‘file logging’ folder of the Bus Pirate LM75A project on the GitHub page.

Experiment: Challenging LM7805 Thermal Shutdown

The ubiquitous LM7805 linear voltage regulator offers internal current limiting (1.5A) and thermal shutdown. I’ve wondered for a long time if I could use this element as a heater. It’s TO-220 package is quite convenient to mount onto enclosures. To see how quickly it heats up and what temperature it rests at, screwed a LM7805 directly to the LM75A breakout board (with a dab of thermal compound). I soldered the output pin to ground (!!!) and recorded temperature while it was plugged in.

Power (12V) was applied to the LM7805 over the red-shaded region. It looks like it took about 2 minutes to reach maximum temperature, and settled around 225F. After disconnecting power, it settled back to room temperature after about 5 minutes. I’m curious if this type of power dissipation is sustainable long term…

Update: Reading LM75A values directly into an AVR

This topic probably doesn’t belong inside this post, but it didn’t fit anywhere else and I don’t want to make it its own post. Now that I have this I2C sensor mounted where I want it, I want a microcontroller to read its value and send it (along with some other data) via serial USART to an FT232 (USB serial adapter). Ultimately I want to take advantage of its comparator thermostat function so I can have a USB-interfaced PC-controllable heater with multiple LM75A ICs providing temperature readings at different sites in my project. To do this, I had to write code to interface my microcontroller to the LM75A. I am using an ATMega328 (ATMega328P) with AVR-GCC (not Arduino). Although there are multiple LM75A senor libraries for Arduino [link] [link] [link] I couldn’t find any examples which didn’t rely on Arduino libraries. I ended up writing functions around g4lvanix’s L2C-master-lib.

Here’s a relevant code snippit. See the full code (with compile notes) on this GitHub page:

uint8_t data[2]; // prepare variable to hold sensor data
uint8_t address=0x91; // this is the i2c address of the sensor
i2c_receive(address,data,2); // read and store two bytes
temperature=(data[0]*256+data[1])/32; // convert two bytes to temperature

 

 

This project lives on my growing GitHub page for microcontroller projects:

https://github.com/swharden/AVR-projects/

 


     

Crystal Oven Testing

To maintain high frequency stability, RF oscillator circuits are sometimes “ovenized” where their temperature is raised slightly above ambient room temperature and held precisely at one temperature. Sometimes just the crystal is heated (with a “crystal oven”), and other times the entire oscillator circuit is heated. The advantage of heating the circuit is that other components (especially metal core instructors) are temperature sensitive. Googling for the phrase “crystal oven”, you’ll find no shortage of recommended circuits. Although a more complicated PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controller may seem enticing for these situations, the fact that the enclosure is so well insulated and drifts so little over vast periods of time suggests that it might not be the best application of a PID controller. One of my favorite write-ups is from M0AYF’s site which describes how to build a crystal oven for QRSS purposes. He demonstrates the MK1 and then the next design the MK2 crystal oven controller.  Here are his circuits:

Briefly, desired temperature is set with a potentiometer. An operational amplifier (op-amp) compares the target temperature with measured temperature (using a thermistor – a resistor which varies resistance by tempearture). If the measured temperature is below the target, the op-amp output goes high, and current flows through heating resistors. There are a few differences between the two circuits, but one of the things that struck me as different was the use of negative feedback with the operational amplifier. This means that rather than being on or off (like the air conditioning in your house), it can be on a little bit. I wondered if this would greatly affect frequency stability. In the original circuit, he mentions

The oven then cycles on and off roughly every thirty or forty seconds and hovers around 40 degrees-C thereafter to within better than one degree-C.

I wondered how much this on/off heater cycle affected temperature. Is it negligible, or could it affect frequency of an oscillator circuit? Indeed his application heats an entire enclosure so small variations get averaged-out by the large thermal mass. However in crystal oven designs where only the crystal is heated, such as described by Bill (W4HBK), I’ll bet the effect is much greater. Compare the thermal mass of these two concepts.

How does the amount of thermal mass relate to how well it can be controlled? How important is negative feedback for partial-on heater operation? Can simple ON/OFF heater regulation adequately stabalize a crystal or enclosure? I’d like to design my own heater, pulling the best elements from the rest I see on the internet. My goals are:

  1. use inexpensive thermistors instead of linear temperature sensors (like LM335)
  2. use inexpensive quarter-watt resistors as heaters instead of power resistors
  3. be able to set temperature with a knob
  4. be able to monitor temperature of the heater
  5. be able to monitor power delivered to the heater
  6. maximum long-term temperature stability

Right off the bat, I realized that this requires a PC interface. Even if it’s not used to adjust temperature (an ultimate goal), it will be used to log temperature and power for analysis. I won’t go into the details about how I did it, other than to say that I’m using an ATMEL ATMega8 AVR microcontroller and ten times I second I sample voltage on each of it’s six 10-bit ADC pins (PC0-PC5), and send that data to the computer with USART using an eBay special serial/USB adapter based on FTDI. They’re <$7 (shipped) and come with the USB cable. Obviously in a consumer application I’d etch boards and use the SMT-only FTDI chips, but for messing around at home I a few a few of these little adapters. They’re convenient as heck because I can just add a heater to my prototype boards and it even supplies power and ground. Convenient, right? Power is messier than it could be because it’s being supplied by the PC, but for now it gets the job done. On the software side, Python with PySerial listens to the serial port and copies data to a large numpy array, saving it every once and a while. Occasionally a bit is sent wrong and a number is received incorrectly (maybe one an hour), but the error is recognized and eliminated by the checksum (just the sum of all transmitted numbers). Plotting is done with numpy and matpltolib. Code for all of that is at the bottom of this post.

That’s the data logger circuit I came up with. Reading six channels ten times a second, it’s more than sufficient for voltage measurement. I went ahead and added an op-amp to the board too, since I knew I’d be using one. I dedicated one of the channels to serve as ambient temperature measurement. See the little red thermistor by the blue resistor? I also dedicated another channel to the output of the op-amp. This way I can measure drive to whatever temperature controller circuity I choose to use down the road. For my first test, I’m using a small thermal mass like one would in a crystal oven. Here’s how I made that:

I then build the temperature controller part of the circuit. It’s pretty similar to that previously published. it uses a thermistor in a voltage divider configuration to sense temperature. It uses a trimmer potentiometer to set temperature. An LED indicator light gives some indication of on/off, but keep in mind that a fraction of a volt will turn the Darlington transistor (TIP122) on slightly although it doesn’t reach a level high enough to drive the LED. The amplifier by default is set to high gain (55x), but can be greatly lowered (negative gain actually) with a jumper. This lets me test how important gain is for the circuitry.

controller

When using a crystal oven configuration, I concluded high high gain (cycling the heater on/off) is a BAD idea. While average temperature is held around the same, the crystal oscillates. This is what is occurring above when M0AYF indicates his MK1 heater turns on and off every 40 seconds. While you might be able to get away with it while heating a chassis or something, I think it’s easy to see it’s not a good option for crystal heaters. Instead, look at the low gain (negative gain) configuration. It reaches temperature surprisingly quickly and locks to it steadily. Excellent.

high gain
high gain configuration tends to oscillate every 30 seconds
low gain / negative gain configuration is extremely stable
low gain / negative gain configuration is extremely stable (fairly high temperature)
Here's a similar experiment with a lower target temperature. Noise is due to unregulated USB power supply / voltage reference. Undeniably, this circuit does not oscillate much if any.
Here’s a similar experiment with a lower target temperature. Noise is due to unregulated USB power supply / voltage reference. Undeniably, this circuit does not oscillate much if any.

Clearly low (or negative) gain is best for crystal heaters. What about chassis / enclosure heaters? Let’s give that a shot. I made an enclosure heater with the same 2 resistors. Again, I’m staying away from expensive components, and that includes power resistors. I used epoxy (gorilla glue) to cement them to the wall of one side of the enclosure.

I put a “heater sensor” thermistor near the resistors on the case so I could get an idea of the heat of the resistors, and a “case sensor” on the opposite side of the case. This will let me know how long it takes the case to reach temperature, and let me compare differences between using near vs. far sensors (with respect to the heating element) to control temperature. I ran the same experiments and this is what I came up with!

heater temperature (blue) and enclosure temperature (green) with low gain (first 20 minutes), then high gain (after) operation. High gain sensor/feedback loop is sufficient to induce oscillation, even with the large thermal mass of the enclosure
CLOSE SENSOR CONTROL, LOW/HIGH GAIN: TOP: heater temperature (blue) and enclosure temperature (green) with low gain (first 20 minutes), then high gain (after) operation. High gain sensor/feedback loop is sufficient to induce oscillation, even with the large thermal mass of the enclosure. BOTTOM: power to the heater (voltage off the op-amp output going into the base of the Darlington transistor). Although I didn’t give the low-gain configuration time to equilibrate, I doubt it would have oscillated on a time scale I am patient enough to see. Future, days-long experimentation will be required to determine if it oscillates significantly.
Even with the far sensor (opposite side of the enclosure as the heater) driving the operational amplifier in high gain mode, oscillations occur. Due to the larger thermal mass and increased distance the heat must travel to be sensed they take much longer to occur, leading them to be slower and larger than oscillations seen earlier when the heater was very close to the sensor.
FAR SENSOR CONTROL, HIGH GAIN: Even with the far sensor (opposite side of the enclosure as the heater) driving the operational amplifier in high gain mode, oscillations occur. Blue is the far sensor temperature. Green is the sensor near the heater temperature. Due to the larger thermal mass and increased distance the heat must travel to be sensed they take much longer to occur, leading them to be slower and larger than oscillations seen earlier when the heater was very close to the sensor.

Right off the bat, we observe that even with the increased thermal mass of the entire enclosure (being heated with two dinky 100 ohm 1/4 watt resistors) the system is prone to temperature oscillation if gain is set too high. For me, this is the final nail in the coffin – I will never use a comparator-type high gain sensor/regulation loop to control heater current. With that out, the only thing to compare is which is better: placing the sensor near the heating element, or far from it. In reality, with a well-insulated device like I seem to have, it seems like it doesn’t make much of a difference! The idea is that by placing it near the heater, it can stabilize quickly. However, placing it far from the heater will give it maximum sensation of “load” temperature. Anywhere in-between should be fine. As long as it’s somewhat thermally coupled to the enclosure, enclosure temperature will pull it slightly away from heater temperature regardless of location. Therefore, I conclude it’s not that critical where the sensor is placed, as long as it has good contact with the enclosure. Perhaps with long-term study (on the order of hours to days) slow oscillations may emerge, but I’ll have to build it in a more permanent configuration to test it out. Lucky, that’s exactly what I plan to do, so check back a few days from now!

Since the data speaks for itself, I’ll be concise with my conclusions:

  • two 1/4 watt 100 Ohm resistors in parallel (50 ohms) are suitable to heat an insulated enclosure with 12V
  • two 1/4 watt 100 Ohm resistors in parallel (50 ohms) are suitable to heat a crystal with 5V
  • low gain or negative gain is preferred to prevent oscillating tempeartures
  • Sensor location on an enclosure is not critical as long as it’s well-coupled to the enclosure and the entire enclosure is well-insulated.

I feel satisfied with today’s work. Next step is to build this device on a larger scale and fix it in a more permanent configuration, then leave it to run for a few weeks and see how it does. On to making the oscillator! If you have any questions or comments, feel free to email me. If you recreate this project, email me! I’d love to hear about it.

Here’s the code that went on the ATMega8 AVR (it continuously transmits voltage measurements on 6 channels).

#define F_CPU 8000000UL
#include <avr/io.h>
#include <util/delay.h>
#include <avr/interrupt.h>

/*
8MHZ: 300,600,1200,2400,4800,9600,14400,19200,38400
1MHZ: 300,600,1200,2400,4800
*/
#define USART_BAUDRATE 38400
#define BAUD_PRESCALE (((F_CPU / (USART_BAUDRATE * 16UL))) - 1)

/*
ISR(ADC_vect)
{
    PORTD^=255;
}
*/

void USART_Init(void){
	UBRRL = BAUD_PRESCALE;
	UBRRH = (BAUD_PRESCALE >> 8);
	UCSRB = (1<<TXEN);
	UCSRC = (1<<URSEL)|(1<<UCSZ1)|(1<<UCSZ0); // 9N1
}

void USART_Transmit( unsigned char data ){
	while ( !( UCSRA & (1<<UDRE)) );
	UDR = data;
}

void sendNum(long unsigned int byte){
	if (byte==0){
		USART_Transmit(48);
	}
	while (byte){
		USART_Transmit(byte%10+48);
		byte-=byte%10;
		byte/=10;
	}
}

int readADC(char adcn){
	ADMUX = 0b0100000+adcn;
	ADCSRA |= (1<<ADSC); // reset value
	while (ADCSRA & (1<<ADSC)) {}; // wait for measurement
	return ADC>>6;
}

int sendADC(char adcn){
	int val;
	val=readADC(adcn);
	sendNum(val);
	USART_Transmit(',');
	return val;
}

int main(void){
	ADCSRA = (1<<ADEN)  | 0b111;
	DDRB=255;
	USART_Init();
	int checksum;

	for(;;){
		PORTB=255;
		checksum=0;
		checksum+=sendADC(0);
		checksum+=sendADC(1);
		checksum+=sendADC(2);
		checksum+=sendADC(3);
		checksum+=sendADC(4);
		checksum+=sendADC(5);
		sendNum(checksum);
		USART_Transmit('n');
		PORTB=0;
		_delay_ms(200);
	}
}

Here’s the command I used to compile the code, set the AVR fuse bits, and load it to the AVR.

del *.elf
del *.hex
avr-gcc -mmcu=atmega8 -Wall -Os -o main.elf main.c -w
pause
cls
avr-objcopy -j .text -j .data -O ihex main.elf main.hex
avrdude -c usbtiny -p m8 -F -U flash:w:"main.hex":a -U lfuse:w:0xe4:m -U hfuse:w:0xd9:m

Here’s the code that runs on the PC to listen to the microchip, match the data to the checksum, and log it occasionally. 

import serial, time
import numpy
ser = serial.Serial("COM16", 38400, timeout=100)

line=ser.readline()[:-1]
t1=time.time()
lines=0

data=[]

def adc2R(adc):
    Vo=adc*5.0/1024.0
    Vi=5.0
    R2=10000.0
    R1=R2*(Vi-Vo)/Vo
    return R1

while True:
    line=ser.readline()[:-1]
    lines+=1
    if "," in line:
        line=line.split(",")
        for i in range(len(line)):
            line[i]=int(line[i][::-1])

    if line[-1]==sum(line[:-1]):
        line=[time.time()]+line[:-1]
        print lines, line
        data.append(line)
    else:
        print  lines, line, "<-- FAIL"

    if lines%50==49:
        numpy.save("data.npy",data)
        print "nSAVINGn%d lines in %.02f sec (%.02f vals/sec)n"%(lines,
            time.time()-t1,lines/(time.time()-t1))

Here’s the code that runs on the PC to graph data.

import matplotlib
matplotlib.use('TkAgg') # <-- THIS MAKES IT FAST!
import numpy
import pylab
import datetime
import time

def adc2F(adc):
    Vo=adc*5.0/1024.0
    K=Vo*100
    C=K-273
    F=C*(9.0/5)+32
    return F

def adc2R(adc):
    Vo=adc*5.0/1024.0
    Vi=5.0
    R2=10000.0
    R1=R2*(Vi-Vo)/Vo
    return R1

def adc2V(adc):
    Vo=adc*5.0/1024.0
    return Vo

if True:
    print "LOADING DATA"
    data=numpy.load("data.npy")
    data=data
    print "LOADED"

    fig=pylab.figure()
    xs=data[:,0]
    tempAmbient=data[:,1]
    tempPower=data[:,2]
    tempHeater=data[:,3]
    tempCase=data[:,4]
    dates=(xs-xs[0])/60.0
    #dates=[]
    #for dt in xs: dates.append(datetime.datetime.fromtimestamp(dt))

    ax1=pylab.subplot(211)
    pylab.title("Temperature Controller - Low Gain")
    pylab.ylabel('Heater (ADC)')
    pylab.plot(dates,tempHeater,'b-')
    pylab.plot(dates,tempCase,'g-')
    #pylab.axhline(115.5,color="k",ls=":")

    #ax2=pylab.subplot(312,sharex=ax1)
    #pylab.ylabel('Case (ADC)')
    #pylab.plot(dates,tempCase,'r-')
    #pylab.plot(dates,tempAmbient,'g-')
    #pylab.axhline(0,color="k",ls=":")

    ax2=pylab.subplot(212,sharex=ax1)
    pylab.ylabel('Heater Power')
    pylab.plot(dates,tempPower)

    #fig.autofmt_xdate()
    pylab.xlabel('Elapsed Time (min)')

    pylab.show()

print "DONE"