Category Archive: DIY ECG

Simple DIY ECG + Pulse Oximeter (version 2)

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Of the hundreds of projects I’ve shared over the years, none has attracted more attention than my DIY ECG machine on the cheap posted almost 4 years ago. This weekend I re-visited the project and made something I’m excited to share!  The original project was immensely popular, my first featured article on Hack-A-Day, and today “ECG” still represents the second most searched term by people who land on my site. My gmail account also has had 194 incoming emails from people asking details about the project. A lot of it was by frustrated students trying to recreate the project running into trouble because it was somewhat poorly documented. Clearly, it’s a project that a wide range of people are interested in, and I’m happy to revisit it bringing new knowledge and insight to the project. I will do my best to document it thoroughly so anyone can recreate it! The goal of this project is to collect heartbeat information on a computer with minimal cost and minimal complexity.  I accomplished this with fewer than a dozen components (all of which can be purchased at RadioShack). It serves both as a light-based heartbeat monitor (similar to a pulse oximeter, though it’s not designed to quantitatively measure …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.SWHarden.com/blog/2013-04-14-simple-diy-ecg-pulse-oximeter-version-2/

Single Wavelength Pulse Oximeter

pulse oximeter wavelength

I want to create a microcontroller application which will utilize information obtained from a home-brew pulse oximeter. Everybody and their cousin seems to have their own slant how to make DIY pulse detectors, but I might as well share my experience. Traditionally, pulse oximeters calculate blood oxygen saturation by comparing absorbance of blood to different wavelengths of light. In the graph below (from Dildy et al., 1996 that deoxygenated blood (dark line) absorbs light differently than oxygenated blood (thin line), especially at 660nm (red) and 920nm (infrared). Therefore, the ratio of the difference of absorption at 660nm vs 920nm is an indication of blood oxygenation. Fancy (or at least well-designed) pulse oximeters continuously look at the ratio of these two wavelengths. Analog devices has a nice pulse oximeter design using an ADuC7024 microconverter. A more hackerish version was made and described on this non-english forum. A fail-at-the-end page of a simpler project is also shown here, but not well documented IMO. That’s not how mine works. I only use a single illumination source (~660nm) and watch it change with respect to time. Variability is due to a recombination effect of blood volume changes and blood oxygen saturation changes as blood …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.SWHarden.com/blog/2012-12-06-single-wavelength-pulse-oximeter/

Multichannel USB Analog Sensor with ATMega48

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Sometimes it’s tempting to re-invent the wheel to make a device function exactly the way you want. I am re-visiting the field of homemade electrophysiology equipment, and although I’ve already published a home made electocardiograph (ECG), I wish to revisit that project and make it much more elegant, while also planning for a pulse oximeter, an electroencephalograph (EEG), and an electrogastrogram (EGG). This project is divided into 3 major components: the low-noise microvoltage amplifier, a digital analog to digital converter with PC connectivity, and software to display and analyze the traces. My first challenge is to create that middle step, a device to read voltage (from 0-5V) and send this data to a computer. This project demonstrates a simple solution for the frustrating problem of sending data from a microcontroller to a PC with a USB connection. My solution utilizes a USB FTDI serial-to-usb cable, allowing me to simply put header pins on my device which I can plug into providing the microcontroller-computer link. This avoids the need for soldering surface-mount FTDI chips (which gets expensive if you put one in every project). FTDI cables are inexpensive (about $11 shipped on eBay) and I’ve gotten a lot of mileage out of mine and know I will continue …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.SWHarden.com/blog/2012-06-14-multichannel-usb-analog-sensor-with-atmega48/

DIY ECG Machine On The Cheap

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Note from the Author: This page documents how I made an incredibly simple ECG machine with a minimum of parts to view the electrical activity of my own heart. Feel free to repeat my experiment, but do so at your own risk. There are similar projects floating around on the internet, but I aim to provide a more complete, well-documented, and cheaper solution, with emphasis on ECG processing and analysis, rather than just visualization. If you have any questions or suggestions please contact me. Also, if you attempt this project yourself I’d love to post your results! Good luck! –Scott Background You’ve probably seen somebody in a hospital setting hooked up to a big mess of wires used to analyze their heartbeat. The goal of such a machine (called an electrocardiograph, or ECG) is to amplify, measure, and record the natural electrical potential created by the heart. Note that cardiac electrical signals are different than heart sounds, which are listened to with a stethoscope. The intrinsic cardiac pacemaker system is responsible for generating these electrical signals which serve to command and coordinate contraction of the four chambers at the heart at the appropriate intervals [atria (upper chambers) first, then the …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.SWHarden.com/blog/2009-08-14-diy-ecg-machine-on-the-cheap/

Defibrillating My DIY ECG Project

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I’ve done a lot of random things the last few months, but few things were as random, cool, or googled-for as my Do-It-Yourself Electrocardiography project . My goal was to produce an effective ECG machine which interfaced the computer sound card for as little cost as possible. I started out small with an extremely simple circuit which technically worked, but required a lot of custom-written software to do a ton of math to decipher the ECG signal from the noise (such as inverse fast flourier transformations after band-stopping several bands of predictable, high-frequency noise). I later started building more complicated circuits in an attempt to minimize the noise, which worked well but were much more difficult to construct. For some reason, my nice ECG circuit died (burned? broke? don’t know why) right after I started to actually generate useful data about my occasional double-beats (which apparently are common, normal, and even expected during basal physiological states). UPDATE: [2am, nextday] Here’s some video of the prototype briefly demonstrating the concept of how to use a minimum of parts to generate a great ECG trace using digital signal processing on the PC side. I’ve decided to revitalize this project quickly and effectively, …

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Permanent link to this article: http://www.SWHarden.com/blog/2009-08-06-defibrillating-my-diy-ecg-project/